Animals of Canada

ONE: I’ve started a podcast for 2017, and I hope you’ll join me over at Animals of Canada for some sweet & savoury & salty stories, straight into your ears.

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TWO: I’m writing articles now-and-again for the Girl’s Guide to Surviving the Apocalypse, so pop over there from time to time to brush up on your end-of-the-world skills. You’ll find me under codename “Skookum”.

THREE: I have a short story included in Hic Dragones’ upcoming anthology, Nothing, and from the looks of things, it’s going to be a wonderful collection. “Bleak and disturbing tales”… sign me up! ūüôā

FOUR: We’ve been busy over at Fox&Bee filming promotional and educational work for our clients, but the blizzard and power outages gave us a little time to slow down, write by candle light, and check out how well the camera films in low light. We hope you’re having a wonderful and creative winter!

Filming Perseverance: Part One

Where’s your wilderness?

For the last few years, we’ve volunteered with the Cumberland Community Forest Society, an organization that is raising money to purchase the forests around our village. I had no idea that volunteering for a charity could be so much FUN – there’s trivia nights (highly competitive, intense, with lots of beer drinking and good-natured carousing), sporting events, plant sales, film nights, art shows, etc etc etc. It’s an amazing and high-spirited group of creative people who are passionate about¬†saving the trees, and the whole experience has been extremely rewarding.

Some of our volunteering includes¬†content creation – ¬†taking photos to document the woods, looking after different social media channels, and providing video content. I’m sure you’ve seen some of the films, because I love to share them and I’m not shy about shouting on this here blog. But we’ve spent the last week creating a new film, and while we’re not yet ready to share it publicly*, I’d love to tell you about the experience.

First of all, please understand that we’ve been doing quite a few Fox&Bee projects through February and March; in fact, since January 1st, we’ve worked¬†for¬†researchers and scientists, solar energy enthusiasts, hospices and hospitals, educational facilities, video game developers, psychics, a couple of government agencies, and private individuals. We’ve met so many varied and fascinating people, and I’ve learned about a wide variety of subjects,¬†from end-of-life care to deep sea worms to the use¬†of mobile phones in the classroom to US politics to the importance of fungi. Serious, 2015 has been a roller coaster of awesomeness.

But through all of this, we wanted to make another film for the CCFS, because it offers a fantastic opportunity to go out, walk in the woods, and have a really good time supporting something we love. So last week, we figured it was time. On Sunday night, Shawn and I sat in the laundry room of our house – the epicentre of creative energy, apparently – and thrashed out a narrative.

On Monday afternoon, we set out to film. We knew that we needed to film the piece chronologically, and that meant we’d have to start deep in the woods, hiking 2.5 kilometres to Allan Lake. Now, I’ll admit, that doesn’t sound far, but please keep in mind that our party includes a 4-year-old, a 9-year-old, and the two adults who are carrying backpacks of camera equipment and supplies, plus a jib. What’s a jib? This is a jib:

Our jib is a homemade model that Shawn built himself, and it comes apart into two pieces, but it’s not lightweight. In fact, a key component are two five-pound weights on the counterbalance. It works like a charm, but it’s not something you just carry around with you for the fun of it. It’s especially fun to carry through the woods, because the part in the backpack sticks up three feet above your head, and the part you carry in your hand is nine feet long.¬†We also had a telescoping pole for underwater shots (length: five feet) and half of a fishing rod (length: two feet) which also stuck out of the top of Shawn’s pack. We snagged a lot of curious looks from bikers and hikers as they passed us on the trail, as well as low-hanging branches and moss.

We made it up to Allen Lake at a reasonable time, then spent an hour looking for a suitable location for the opening shot. Allen Lake is the water reservoir for Cumberland, so there’s no swimming or boating allowed, which means it’s peaceful and serene, surrounded by thick forests.

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The only other living creatures we saw were ravens, crows, and a couple of tired, mud-spattered mountain bikers. We captured the opening shots and started working our way back towards home, but it had taken us longer to find a location than we’d anticipated, and the sun was starting to set. We had hoped this would be a one-day shoot, but sadly, we realized it was going to take two days.

Ha.

Remember, friends: if you think something is going to take you an hour to film, prepare to be filming for four. And if you think it’s going to take you a day, well…. I’m sure you can do the math.

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*The film will be launched at the Cumberland Mountain Film Festival on April 10, and then shown again at the Spring Trivia Night on April 17. After that, world dominatio– uh, I mean release.